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Biology

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Contract SheetCourse DescriptionStudy Plan

General Education Electives

ADM 120 - Microeconomics (3 Credits)
An overview of the modern market economy as a system for dealing with the problem of scarcity. Operation and decision-making of economic units; supply, demand and resource allocation; analysis of various market and industry structures; shortages, controls, social costs and benefits; international trade; comparative systems.
ADM 115 - Introduction to Law and Constitutional Law (3 Credits)
BIO130 - Ecology (2 Credits)
BIO135 - Neuroscience (2 Credits)
BIO140 - Oncology (2 Credits)
BIO145 - Neurophysiology (2 Credits)
BIO380 - Research Methods (2 Credits)
GEO201 - General Geology (3 Credits)
LIT 150 - Introduction to Political Science (3 Credits)
تبحث هذه المادة في عوامل الصراع السياسي بشتى أنواع. كما وتتطق إلى أطر وسائل الكفاح وذلك ربطاً بطبقية الأنظمة السياسية الحاكمة. وتركز على عوامل الصراع التالية: العامل الديمغرافي، الجغرافي، الاقتصادي، الثقافي، النفسي. وبخصوص أطر الكفاح فيتم التركيز على الكفاح السلمي والحربي.
LIT 160 - Introductory Islamic Economy (3 Credits)

Major Requirements

BCH240 - Biochemistry I (3 Credits)
Biochemistry of nucleic acids, proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids with an emphasis on the kinetics, thermodynamics, catalytic and regulatory strategies of biochemical reactions and bioenergetics. Designed for biochemistry majors and others desiring part one of a two semester comprehensive biochemistry series.
BCH240L - Biochemistry I Lab (1 Credits)
Biochemistry of nucleic acids, proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids with an emphasis on the kinetics, thermodynamics, catalytic and regulatory strategies of biochemical reactions and bioenergetics. Designed for biochemistry majors and others desiring part one of a two semester comprehensive biochemistry series.
BCH310 - Biochemistry II (3 Credits)
Continuation of Biochemistry I with focus on metabolic pathways, cycles, and control mechanisms. This course will cover bioenergetics and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides. Designed for biochemistry majors and others desiring part two of a two semester comprehensive biochemistry series.
BCH310L - Biochemistry II Lab (1 Credits)
Continuation of Biochemistry I with focus on metabolic pathways, cycles, and control mechanisms. This course will cover bioenergetics and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids and nucleotides. Designed for biochemistry majors and others desiring part two of a two semester comprehensive biochemistry series.
BIO131 - General Biology (3 Credits)
General Biology is designed to provide the fundamentals of biological science. This course emphasis and covers the following topics: general chemistry and biochemistry of the cell, cell structure and function, origin and evolution of living things, molecular and organismal genetics, classification, animal development (reproduction and embryology): form and function, and vertebrate physiology and ecology. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels as well as developmental and environmental level. This course is intended for students majoring in biology or for non-biology majors who wish to take advanced biology courses.
BIO131L - General Biology Lab (1 Credits)
Laboratory exercises reinforce lecture topics. In addition to laboratory safety, it includes microscope techniques as well as developing laboratory skills such as instrumentation.
BIO160 - Cell Biology (3 Credits)
This course introduces the student to the cell as a unit of structure of all living organisms. It includes: cell theory, biodiversity and classification of living things, plant cell wall and plasmodesmata and bacterial cell wall, structure and functions of cells and cellular organelles, Cell cycle and mechanism of cell division, cellular respiration and energy transformers, chromatin and DNA structure, function and packaging, cellular junctions.
BIO165 - Anatomy (2 Credits)
This course examines the basic concepts of structure and function of the human body. There are nine systems in the human body. This course covers the processes of skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. The objective is to grossly pinpoint the location and function of any organ or tissue within human corps.
BIO170 - General Zoology I (3 Credits)
Introduction to the living animal continuity and evolution, principles of genetics, organic evolution, reproduction and development, diversity of animal life (structural patterns, classification and phylogeny, principles of nomenclatures); invertebrate and vertebrate animals; activity of life; behavior; animal environment and its influence on its distribution and adaptations.
BIO175 - Histology (3 Credits)
Lecture topics, laboratory experiences and class discussions incorporate the basic topics in tissue anatomy, organization and histochemistry of vertebrates emphasizing mammalian histophysiology. Thus, this course consists of the study of different major tissues: epithelial, connective, cartilage, bone, muscular, and nervous tissue. Students will use various techniques of preparing plant and animal tissues by sectioning and staining for microscopic study in the laboratory.
BIO180 - General Botany (3 Credits)
This course features major plant groups and emphasizes plant life cycles, anatomy, morphology, taxonomy, biological contributions, and development. It also describes and recognizes the distinguishing characteristics of diverse groups. Topics also cover economically important plant products, and medicinal and poisonous plants. At the end of this course, students will be able to explain the importance of botany as a past, present, and future science.
BIO180L - General Botany Lab (1 Credits)
This laboratory work demonstrates field skills required for the examination and identification of plant tissues and specimens.
BIO215 - Physiology (3 Credits)
This course examines the basic physiological and biochemical processes that determine and govern plant function. Topics include photosynthesis, mitochondrial metabolism, energetics, transport systems, water relations, cell walls, phytohormones, gene expression, and selected aspects of secondary plant metabolism. The laboratory work features experiments selected to demonstrate and reinforce important principles discussed in lecture. Topics include plant physiology: nutrition, enzymology, photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, plant hormones, and seed germination.
BIO220 - Plant Physiology (3 Credits)
Plant water relations: absorption, transport and transpiration. Mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, phloem translocation, phytohormones. growth, dormancy ; seed germination, phytochrome and phtomorphogenesis and stress physiology.
BIO220L - Plant Physiology Lab (1 Credits)
Plant water relations: absorption, transport and transpiration. Mineral nutrition, photosynthesis, phloem translocation, phytohormones. growth, dormancy ; seed germination, phytochrome and phtomorphogenesis and stress physiology.
BIO221 - General Zoology II (2 Credits)
A review or the history of evolution and evidence for it, biogeography; natural barriers and oceanic islands; fossils and fossilization, origin of life, biogenetic law; the origin of variation and the genetic basis of evolution, natural section, adaptation and evolution; species and speciation; rates of evolutionary changes, ecology, behavior, and evolution; human evolution; the primates and apes; family Hominidae; major functional and structural changes in relation to new habitat; origin of man; genus Homo, and the rise of modern man.
BIO221L - General Zoology II Lab (1 Credits)
A review or the history of evolution and evidence for it, biogeography; natural barriers and oceanic islands; fossils and fossilization, origin of life, biogenetic law; the origin of variation and the genetic basis of evolution, natural section, adaptation and evolution; species and speciation; rates of evolutionary changes, ecology, behavior, and evolution; human evolution; the primates and apes; family Hominidae; major functional and structural changes in relation to new habitat; origin of man; genus Homo, and the rise of modern man.
BIO230 - General Microbiology (2 Credits)
This course explores the biology of microorganisms whether they are unicellular, multi cellular, or even acellular. Major areas to be covered include microbial cell structure and function, physiology, metabolism, genetics, diversity and ecology. Applied aspects of microbiology will also be covered, such as biotechnology, the role of microorganisms in environmental processes, and medical microbiology. Microbiology is a prerequisite for many subjects such as virology, mycology, parasitology, bacteriology and immunology.
BIO230L - General Microbiology Lab (1 Credits)
Microbiological laboratory is based on procedures that usually must be aseptic, and use a variety of tools such as light microscopes with a combination of stains and dyes. The laboratory experiments include media preparation and their different types, methods to count, detect and identify microorganisms, cultivation & isolation of bacteria, antibiotic disc sensibility test.
BIO300 - Transmission Genetics (2 Credits)
Basic principles of classical genetics. Meiosis and chromosomal basis of Mendelian inheritance. Linkage, crossing-over and gene mapping. Sex and heredity. The genetic material. Mutations and chromosome aberrations. Pattern of inheritance. Cytoplasmic inheritance. Population genetics.
BIO305 - Molecular Biology (3 Credits)
An extension and expansion of BCH310 emphasizing the basics of molecular genetic processes in bacteria, plants, and animals. It also includes a study of gene organization and control of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, emphasizing applications in modern biotechnology, and the genetic and biochemical techniques involved in manipulating and assaying gene expression.
BIO305L - Molecular Biology Lab (1 Credits)
An extension and expansion of BCH310 emphasizing the basics of molecular genetic processes in bacteria, plants, and animals. It also includes a study of gene organization and control of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, emphasizing applications in modern biotechnology, and the genetic and biochemical techniques involved in manipulating and assaying gene expression.
BIO310 - Biotechnology (2 Credits)
It is a field of applied biology that involves the use of living organisms and bioprocesses in engineering, technology, medicine and other fields requiring biological products. Biotechnology also utilizes these products for manufacturing purpose. Modern use of similar terms includes genetic engineering as well as cell and tissue culture technologies. This course should cover the principles and the applications of new technology to plants and microbial organisms. The students would learn more about the use of genetically engineered products to solve environmental problems.
BIO345 - Immunology (3 Credits)
The course deals with the physiological functioning of the immune system in states of both health and diseases; malfunctions of the immune system in immunological disorders (autoimmune diseases, hypersensitivities, immune deficiency, transplant rejection); the physical, chemical and physiological characteristics of the components of the immune system in vitro, in situ, and in vivo. This course will focus on the role and component of the immune system, immune response and finally disorders of the immune system.
BIO390 - Graduation Project (2 Credits)
This course includes the participation in a laboratory or library research project under supervision of a faculty member.
CHM165 - General Chemistry I (3 Credits)
Measurements and significant figures, chemical reactions; stoichiometry; the gaseous state; thermo chemistry; electronic structure and periodicity; chemical bonding; molecular shapes; states of matter and intermolecular forces; physical properties of solutions, principles of equilibrium.
CHM165L - General Chemistry I Lab (1 Credits)
CHM246 - Organic Chemistry I (2 Credits)
Atomic Structure; Bonding; Lewis structures, line structures, Wave properties of electrons, atomic and molecular orbitals; Single and multiple bonding in organic molecules; Molecular shapes and hybridization; Bond rotation; Isomers and stereoisomers; Dipole moments and other intermolecular forces; Solubility; Structure and Stereochemistry of Alkanes; Stereochemistry; Alkyl Halides: Nucleophilic Substitution and Elimination; Structure, classification and reactions of Alkenes, Alkynes and Alcohols. Multiscale Operational Organic Chemistry: Properties of Functional Groups; Separating the Components of Panacetin and Recrystallization and Melting Point; Separation of Unknown by Column Chromatography; Preparation of 2-chloro-2-methylbutane; Dehydration of 4-Methylcyclohexanol; Synthesis of Salicylic acid.
CHM246L - Organic Chemistry I Lab (1 Credits)
This course introduces the students to basic techniques and procedures to isolate, purify, and to characterize organic compounds and simple reactions used in the organic laboratory. The student will also be trained on the proper practices to write a scientific laboratory report.
ENV201 - Environmental Science (3 Credits)
Application of biology, geology, hydrology to environmental issues. Addressing environmental problems from the standpoint of ethics, risk, and scientific and social feasibility. Emphasis on agricultural systems and natural resources.
STAT156 - Principles of Biostatistics (2 Credits)
Statistics is application in a wide range of topics in biology. The science of biostatistics encompasses the design of biological experiments, especially in medicine and agriculture; the collection, summarization, and analysis of data from those experiments; and the interpretation of, and inference from, the results. Students will focus in this course on descriptive statistics, distribution, probability, estimation problems, test Chi square, means, variance, median, regression and correlation.
PHY101 - General Physics (3 Credits)
This course should cover basic information such as motion in one and two dimensions, Newton's law, mechanical energies, Rotational, Waves, sound and Light, geometrical and physical optics, temperature, heat.

General Education Requirements

ADM 105 - Introduction to Information Technology (3 Credits)
Topics include the Internet; computer hardware; operating systems and application software; multimedia; network communication; personal, social, and ethical issues. Systems and application software; multimedia; network communication; personal, social, and ethical issues.
EDU 105 - Introduction to Sociology (3 Credits)
يتناول المقرر: تعريف علم الاجتماع وعلاقته بغيره من فروع المعرفة, مفهومه,أهميته, فروعه وأبحاثه. علاقته بالفلسفة والتاريخ والجغرافيا وعلم النفس والاقتصاد والسياسة والقانون والأديان واللغة. المجتمعات والجماعات البشرية, مكونات النظم الاجتماعية, عمليات الضبط الاجتماعي, مفاهيم المراكز والأدوار الاجتماعية, العمليات والمتغيرات الاجتماعية, الظواهر الاجتماعية والمشكلات والعوامل المؤثرة في الظواهر الاجتماعية.
LIT 110 - Arabic Language I (3 Credits)
The primary aim of this course is to familiarize the students with correct writing styles, to avoid linguistic and spelling errors, to use proper punctuations, and to master various correspondence styles. The course also discusses the main principles of Arabic grammar through selected texts, spelling rules, writing paragraphs about subjects related to the selected texts, summary techniques, punctuations, rules of number spelling, common linguistic errors, titles, Curriculum Vitae editing techniq
LIT 120 - English Language I / French Language I (3 Credits)
This is a study skills course that aims at developing potential teacher’s proficiency in the skills of test taking, studying, word attacking, paraphrasing, restating and handwriting.
LIT 105 - Arabic Civilization (3 Credits)
This course introduces the overall concepts of civilization and the most important factors that contributed to the emergence of Islamic civilization. It also encompasses the main characteristics of the Islamic civilization with particular focus on the human dimension. Manifestations of Islamic civilization in policy, management, economy, society, and sciences are emphasized.

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